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Post Info TOPIC: 1st October 1956 Vulcan Crash Heathrow


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1st October 1956 Vulcan Crash Heathrow


I think most of us will remember this one, or reading about it, where the Vulcan XA897 was returning from a flag waving exercise, this is the aircraft in which Bomber Command Chief Harry Broadhurst was aboard

Details here http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=c9b_1243608489



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Sergeant

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RE: Vulcan Crash Heathrow October 1st 1956


Hi Chaps

I was walking down the Crescent in Steamer Point when she did a low beat up after take off from Khormaksar;scared the locals to death.

We heard about the crash next day in Air Movements;I was told the fact there were only two ejection seats and the chaps in the rear perished.

cheers

jhy

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RAf Bridgnorth basic training 1954 then posted to the Middle East RAF Staging Post Mauripur Pakistan 1954-56 RAF HQBF Aden 1956 RAF Khormaksar 1956-7 RAF Lyneham 1957


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Why no ejector seats for rear crew members in our V bombers,i believe the Americans had them in their B47s and B52s



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peter humphreys


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That was the day when the phrase "doing a Harry" was coined.  Himself used his bang seat, "I'm all right Jack!"



-- Edited by Eddy on Sunday 4th of March 2012 10:36:20 AM

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Interesting facts regarding the ejection seat debate

On 1 July, 1960 Valiant WP199 took off from RAF Finningley, Yorkshire and set course for the Martin-Baker airfield at Chalgrove, Oxfordshire. The bomber approached the airfield at 1,000 feet and in view of various representatives of the ministry, manufacturers and Royal Air Force, the man in the hot seat4, banged out of the rear compartment, facing backwards. W T 'Doddy' Hay, a civilian tester and part-time guinea-pig for the Martin-Baker company, exited the Valiant in the ejector seat and arced high above the tail of the aircraft. As the seat stabilised under the influence of a trailing drogue parachute, a shackle automatically released, separating him from the seat and deployed his main parachute. He remains to this day the only person to have ejected from the rear compartment of any V-Bomber. The test conclusively proved the viability of rearward-facing ejection.

The next day the Daily Express reported the successful test with the headline 'FIRST MAN OUT'. The test had been carried out under restricted conditions without any press invited. The Express reporter had lurked on the airfield and had managed to take an illicit photograph of the ejection which accompanied the scoop headline. Unfortunately the implicit 'first' (of many) was to be proved premature. Only a few weeks later the decision was taken by the Air Ministry not to modify the V-Bombers. The Express relayed the news to the general public with the headline:

'BOMBER MEN STAY IN PERIL - BY ORDER'.
'In view of the ... considerable time, effort, disruption and cost which would be involved in modifying the aircraft, it has been decided that the provision of ejection seats for rear crew members cannot be justified'.

The Express condemned the decision as 'monstrous' and the matter was again raised in the House of Commons on 25 January, 1961. The Conservative Secretary of State for Air, Julian Amery, defended the decision and when responding to a question made the extraordinary statement which almost completely evaded the point at issue:

I am advised that the greater number of accidents take place at high altitudes when pilots are able, with their ejector seats, to go on piloting while the rest of the crew escape; they then have the advantage of ejection in the latter phase of the accident. When accidents happen at low level, this is not so easy. The honourable gentleman and I have travelled together in airliners, and in those airliners there were no ejection seats or any other kind of escape apparatus.

See http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/place-london/A49097307



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Ken Patchett


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kpatchett wrote:

'BOMBER MEN STAY IN PERIL - BY ORDER'.
'In view of the ... considerable time, effort, disruption and cost which would be involved in modifying the aircraft, it has been decided that the provision of ejection seats for rear crew members cannot be justified'.


 While doing crash escape training on Lancasters in 1956, we were told: "when the aircraft stops moving jump out and RUN!  Never mind that Hollywood stuff about going back to a burning aircraft to rescue your mate.  Remember you cost 'Er Majesty £50,000 on the hoof.  Leave the heroics to the crash crew: they only cost a few thousand apiece!biggrin  Apparently it then cost £50,000 a year to train aircrew.  50 grand for Siggies, 100 grand for Navs, 150 grand for peelots.  I guess modifying Vs cost more than a Nav or two and an AE, so long as 300 grand was saved by the two drivers!smile



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Procurement officials should have been given the chance of a non ejection seat trip!

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....................with Harry Broadhurst driving!biggrin



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Administrator - SWO

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1st October 1956 Vulcan Crash Heathrow


A new post on the old forum here overnight http://www.voy.com/130994/ re this Vulcan prang



-- Edited by Admin on Sunday 11th of March 2012 09:11:11 AM

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Master AEOp

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Apparently that's an Admin only page, John.

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